What If We Were Free?: Riley Curry and Blackgirl Freedom

Unlike many of my homegirls, my love with basketball goes far beyond the 2000 film featuring Sanaa Lathan and Omar Epps. While I have never been able to play worth a damn (I’m an artist, not an athlete), my mama and older sister were basketball stars in our small town (my sister famously played on the boy’s team when we were in middle school, and gave them all they could handle). Work, life, bills and responsibilities (and the fact that I have not been fully wed to a professional team since the 90’s Bulls), I am generally disconnected from the …Read more »

The Rage of White Folks

If you let the news tell it, Black folks are rampaging all across the United States for no reason at all. Just looting and bashing police cars and making indulgent, extravagant messes across major urban areas when they should be at home getting their children fathers or learning how to not speak Ebonics. Or something like that. Yes, many Black folk are righteously indignant about the fact that #Every28Hours a Black person is killed by some sort of law enforcement or vigilante. Every day or so a Black person gets their spine smashed while cuffed in a paddywagon, or gets …Read more »

A Black Mother’s Love (or What Love Looks Like in Public)

I planned to write a blog about the unconscionable inconsolable injustice that is plaguing the black community right now.  I was going to write about how black lives matter (always have, always will), how condemning black folk for hurting, and calling them animals and savages for being treated like animals and savages, is just that bullshit disguised as being deep, and how the protests in Baltimore following Freddie Gray’s death and funeral, while still waiting for explicit details on why the hell he died, is just and justified–but as I search for words they feel overly familiar.  Like so many …Read more »

New Series: Dalit History Month – We Are Because He Was

We at the CFC believe that our work crosses issues and borders. We believe that transnational feminist solidarity is a key element of feminist praxis for those of us who live in the US. We have much to learn from and share with feminist thinker and organizers from around the world. Over the month of April, to commemorate the first ever Dalit History Month, we will be sharing with you a series of posts to raise awareness about the history and organizing done by the Dalit community, in India and abroad. In coming weeks we will be sharing Dalit feminist …Read more »

New Series – Dalit History Month: Dalit Women Fight!

We at the CFC believe that our work crosses issues and borders. We believe that transnational feminist solidary is a key element of feminist praxis for those of us who live in the US. We have much to learn from and share with feminist thinker and organizers from around the world. Over the month of April, to commemorate the first ever Dalit History Month, we will be sharing with you a series of posts to raise awareness about the history and organizing done by the Dalit community, in India and abroad. In coming weeks we will be sharing Dalit feminist …Read more »

Teachers are Not Magical Negroes

When I was in the 7th grade, I moved from Connecticut to South Florida. I was a nerdy kid that loved reading, science, and social studies and had been tracked into the gifted and talented track during my years of schooling. But when I got to Fort Lauderdale I entered a middle school where we sat in class and watched the Jerry Springer Show, where we were being babysat rather than taught. I felt pretty bummed out about that and spent a lot of time in the library teaching myself. My mom worked 12 hours a day, 6 days a …Read more »

The Bold and Beautiful Possibilities of a Transgender Storyline on Daytime

Soap operas have been an on-again-off-again part of my every (week) day life since I was a little blackgirl trying to keep up with conversations in my mama’s living room.  All the grown women in my family watched “the stories,” whether it meant having them on while they cooked and got ready for a second shift job, recorded them on recycled VHS tapes to watch every night or on the weekends, or taking their lunch hour right around 1 o’clock so they could watch, uninterrupted, at work.  We watched the scandalous and fantastical lifestyles of oblivious whitefolks and invited them …Read more »

A Scandal and A Lawn Chair: Why Olivia Pope Can’t Save Us From Racism

  Like many other folk, I was in my feelings after watching “The Lawn Chair,” episode of Scandal a few weeks ago.  So much so that I spent the weekend offline pre-gaming season 2 episodes of House of Cards in preparation for a marathon binge of season 3 over spring break.  It was because of my internet hiatus that I was not aware of the University of Oklahoma chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s racist video that surfaced that Sunday until Monday afternoon in my class when students brought it up during a roundtable panel on race.  I was overwhelmed, trying to …Read more »

#CFCTaughtMe: 5 Lessons on Life & Relationships On the Occasion of Our 5th Birthday

  This past weekend, I hung out with the Harvard Black Law Students Association at their Annual Conference. Mega-brilliant, these young Black folk are poised to do great things, and I really enjoyed kicking it with them. I was on a Black Media Matters panel with the Very Smart Brothas and Kimberly Foster of For Harriet, all fierce Black folk striving to making our lives matter in the realm of representation. It was a pleasure to panel with them. So sitting in that room full of mega-intelligent, accomplished young Black folks, inevitably our panel turned to the question of “positive …Read more »

What Marshawn Lynch and Richard Sherman Teach Us About Respectability & Black Masculinity

Like 114.5 million other folk, I was watching the Super Bowl on Sunday night, the most watched show in U.S. TV history (shouts out to Missy Elliott’s halftime performance, yes gawd!).  As a Carolina Panther fan I was not terribly invested in the outcome, but I was low key rooting for the Seahawks 1) because I regularly root for the underdog and 2) I live for the badassery of Richard Sherman and Marshawn Lynch.  The badassery I speak of is not limited to their on the field athletic prowess (Sherman is a cornerback who attended Stanford, and Lynch is a …Read more »

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