Tag Archives: hip hop

A Crunk Feminist Response to Solange, Jay, & Bey

Earlier this week, TMZ released the now infamous elevator video of Solange going HAM on Jay Z.  The responses have been swift and the memes have been hilarious.  I’m a let y’all finish but, there are a few things missing from the conversation. First of all, Solange was dead wrong.  Now don’t get me wrong, I am a huge Solange fan. She’s my favorite little sister in the history of celebrity little sisters.  I’ve always appreciated her spunk and her fighter spirit. Real talk,  I always liked that there was a possibility that she might haul off and slap somebody. …Read more »

Five Ways Talib Kweli Can Become a Better Ally to Women in Hip Hop

  After this latest week of utter shamtastery in Hip Hop, the words of the late great Aaliyah resonate now more than ever: We need a resolution; there is so much confusion. Rick Ross thinks that drugging a woman and raping her isn’t rape, but rather a case of misunderstanding. FOH Talib Kweli thinks that the first responsibility that women in Hip Hop have to men in Hip Hop is to love to them. Despite his alleged support for Frank Ocean, Busta Rhymes remains an unrepentant and violent homophobe. From my armchair therapist’s seat, I want to ask what Busta …Read more »

(Un)Clutching My Mother’s Pearls, or Ratchetness and the Residue of Respectability

The recent news that ATL rapper Shawty Lo (of Laffy Taffy fame) may be the potential star of a new reality show featuring him, his 11 children, and his 10 baby mamas had this feminist searching for somebody’s pearls to clutch,  seeing as how even the First Lady’s love of pearls has not inspired me to cop a strand of my own. I watched the trailer for this latest train wreck out of Atlanta in mild disgust and mega internal conflict. On the one hand, I felt compelled to embrace this potential portrayal of what one friend called an “alternate …Read more »

A (Not So) Guilty Pleasure: Love & Hip Hop Atlanta

By now, many of you have experienced the delightful ratchet theater that is Love & Hip Hop Atlanta. One word: Ratchetstilksin Love and Hip Hop Atlanta is the brain-child of producer, Mona Scott-Young, who also unleashed upon the world created the first Love and Hip Hop series. LAHHA follows, as you might have guessed, the high and lows of several (not particularly well-known) artists, producers, baby mamas, and the like who are enmeshed in the music scene in Hotlanta. After randomly stumbling upon the show a few weeks ago, I must confess that I am hooked. I swear I watch …Read more »

The Evolution of a Down Ass Chick, Part II (or Why Miss Independent Is Probably Single)

NOTE:  This blog continues the conversation about the implications of hip hop masculinity on heterosexual love relationships between black men and women (see The Evolution of a Down Ass Chick). Independent Woman: A woman who pays her own bills, buys her own things, and DOES NOT allow a man to affect her stability or self-confidence. She supports herself on her own entirely and is proud to be able to do so (Urban Dictionary) My father’s absence and general disinterest in me growing up, alongside my mother and grandmother’s insistence that I know how to take care of myself, led to …Read more »

On Ashley Judd and the Politics of Citation

A couple of folks were asking for a crunk response to Ashley Judd’s memoir passages and the resulting controversy. Judd is being called to task for singling out rap music as the “contemporary soundtrack of misogyny.” You can read her words here. There are lots of responses that you can check out but I want to say something about the folks who defend Judd’s words with “Well, She has a point.” Black women have been talking about (and back to) misogyny in hip-hop since it’s inception. Y’all remember Roxanne Shanté right? It’s frustrating when all the work that black women …Read more »

Ten Crunk Commandments for Re-Invigorating Hip Hop Feminist Studies

This past weekend, the CFC attended the important Black and Brown Feminisms in Hip Hop Media Conference at UT San Antonio. We had a great time and  were reminded of all the wonderful possibilities in the field of Hip Hop (and) Feminist Studies, and we thought we would share a summary of our presentation and our thoughts on what can move the field forward. Thanks to  CFs Aisha, Susana, and Rachel for their contributions to this post. Know your history. – If you are going to engage in scholarship on Hip Hop and/or Feminism, know and cite the authors who …Read more »

Holloween, The Mourning-After Poem

At a Halloween house party where I was one of two African American college students, I came to represent available, accessible sex. I was transformed from a sexual subject to object by the rap music and by the anonymous white guy who groped me. The rap music was so loud that I could not hear my soul yelling “No.” I felt hollow. I did nothing that night. I was consumed with rage. This is my mourning-after poem, my way of reconstructing and reclaiming that (body) part of me. I still feel the echo, My voice cursing This drunken 6 ft. …Read more »

Sticks, Stones & Microphones

I can still hear a whisper (song). Arms oval. Neck curled. Hips sway to the familiar southern bass from a black (male) speaker rapping to me the dance floor.  Before I could face the voice coaxing me to move, he drops his hook—a line about a violent sexual fantasy, a common come-on echoed in hip hop club culture.  Still.  Arms raised, I am arrested by his lyrics likening sex to a beating. He wants to “blow my back out.” His lines are in step with other rap courters recounting sexual conquests by the penetrative acts of cutting, bussing, stabbing, screwing, …Read more »

Nicki’s World

As BET gets set to air its documentary about women and hip hop Monday, I am finding my 30-plus, old school feminist-self working hard to gear up to get down with the over-the-top, lyrically layered, brand savvy rapper that is Nicki Minaj. The self-described Barbie is inescapable. She works every rap and R&B hook, and changes her looks to fashion what could be categorized as camp, cultural appropriation or classic sexual objectification.  Until Minaj, I’ve managed to safely maneuver around mainstream new millennium starlets because they offered no more than a cookie-cutter replica of the unique hip hop dynamism I …Read more »

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