Blog Archives

Clair Huxtable is Dead: On Slaying the Cosbys and Making Space for Liv, Analise, and Mary Jane

That Bill Cosby drugged and raped women for sport for many years is not new news. Apparently, the story has floated for years, and several months ago I read the testimony of two new women who had come forward, after the statute of limitations had run out, simply because they wanted to tell their story. Now that a Black male comedian Hannibal Burress has had the courage to take Cosby to task for his conservative, anti-poor, misogynist respectability rants, people are listening again. It sucks that folks only believe women were really raped when another man says he believes them, …Read more »

Abolish the Box: Moving Beyond Criminality in Addressing Sexual Violence

Guest post by the Incarceration to Education Coalition We, the Incarceration to Education Coalition, are a group of activists working to eradicate barriers to higher education for currently and formerly incarcerated people. Our primary goal is to abolish the Box, the question on college applications that forces applicants to disclose their “criminal” records. Our vision is abolitionist, and our founding principle is that education is a human right.   Throughout our hundreds of conversations with fellow students, community members, and administrators, we have received support and affirmation, but also racism, fear, and institutional violence. One of the most consistent responses …Read more »

Black Autumn: On Black Anger, Tiredness, and the Limits of Self-Care

The turning of autumn is one of my favorite times of year. Having been on an academic calendar my entire life, fall is the season of new beginnings, a time to turn up the intensity of scholarly production, teaching, meetings, school. But that intensity is also greeted with the changing of fall leaves and hopefully a cool respite to a swiftly passing hot summer. While this summer was unusually cool in terms of the weather, it was inordinately hot in terms of the toll that the machinations of summer have taken on the lives of people of color. We start …Read more »

A Poem for Renisha McBride

  Hopefully, you have been following the trial of Theodore Wafer, a Michigan man, who killed 19 year old Renisha McBride last fall when she came to his door in the early morning hours after a car accident begging for help. He shot and killed her through a locked door, because he claims he felt afraid. Local residents in Detroit, marched and rallied on Renisha’s behalf and ensured her killer was brought to trial. But there has been no national outrage of the sort we saw last year with Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis. Wafer’s attorney has attempted to prove …Read more »

My Brother’s Keeper & the Co-Optation of Intersectionality

  Yesterday, while we lamented the SCOTUS decision to exempt Hobby Lobby and other Corporations-cum-People from paying for birth control because it violates their religious freedom, I learned that 30 Black women released a signed letter offering their support for the President’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative.  This letter from women like former Atlanta mayor Shirley Franklin and Rev. Bernice King, daughter of Martin Luther King, Jr., comes on the heels of two major letters from the African American Policy Forum, one from a group of 200 Black men asking for the inclusion of women and girls in My Brother’s Keeper …Read more »

Jesus Wasn’t A Slut-Shamer or How Conservative Theology Harms Black Women

I’m a feminist who believes in God. Raised Christian, I still attend church.  But what I am not is a person who will willingly check her brain, political convictions, or academic training at the door in order to enter the house of God or to participate in a community of faith. Express homophobic views, tell me that God requires me to let a man rule my house because I have a vagina, or spout a prosperity theology premised on the idea that poor folks are poor because they lack faith, and you are likely to see me get up and …Read more »

On bell, Beyonce’, and Bullshit

Out of respect for elders, I haven’t been pressed to weigh in on why the venerable bell hooks might find it reasonable to refer to Beyoncé as a terrorist. Yet, I felt compelled to respond this morning, after reading this piece from Rev. Osagyefo Sekou at Truth-Out.org, that indicts an entire generation of Black intellectuals for apparently “believ[ing] that the system is a good system that only needs to provide greater access to the historically othered.” Who exactly are these people who believe this liberal claptrap?  Because of this alleged belief in the “goodness” of our current racist, capitalist, patriarchal …Read more »

An Ontology of CRUNK: Theorizing (the) Turn Up

For your #TurnUp Tuesday pleasure, I thought I’d do a little Crunk theorizing today. As y’all already know, CRUNK is a generative term, a percussive term that centrally points to the kind of energy generated by putting disparate elements together like hip hop and feminism or black nationalism and feminism or crunk and feminism.   The kind of sonic expressiveness that encapsulates crunkness is heavily reliant on a percussion driven sound. So as we aimed to put the terms crunk and feminism together, we were interested in how the expressive culture of crunk could animate our feminism.   CRUNK Feminism …Read more »

Who Will Keep Our Sisters? A Rant About the Incredibly Bad Arguments in Defense of My Brother’s Keeper

It’s Saturday Morning. It’s International Women’s Day. And I have a rant. A rant that I need to share in this community of like-minded folks. A rant so that I don’t lose my shit with some educated Black men, who need to be hemmed up by the cufflinks. On Thursday, in my weekly column at Salon, I wrote about the President’s new My Brother’s Keeper Initiative, and what it means for Black and Brown women and girls, who have yet again been decentered from the national conversation on race and class disparities. Now if you follow my work at Salon, …Read more »

CFC Talks Love with Author Kiese Laymon

Hey Crunk Family, We are incredibly excited about the next installment in our annual love series. In this video, CF Crunktastic interviews author and professor Kiese Laymon.   Kiese has written beautifully about the politics of love among Black men and women, not just romantically, but in rough political times like these. Below, we are providing you links to two of his most recent essays, links to both of his books which are awesome and will give you your entire life. But first watch the interview. It’s a great way to kick off your week. You’ll be so glad you …Read more »

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